Archive for February 2013

Toast of the Town: Camellia

Camellia’s are currently the toast of the town from a delightful January 16th  New York Times article interviewing local plantsman Charles Cresson to highlights in the January 2013 American Nurserymen. As a matter of fact, we received a visit from the International Camellia Society president, Patricia Short, this fall. We are also exploring possibility of creating a camellia garden along Chester road.

 

Camellia oleifera 'Winter's Interlude' in bloom in Harry Wood Garden. photo credit: J. Coceano

Camellias are enjoying resurgence and new found home in the northern latitudes due the breeding efforts of Dr. Clifford Parks of Camellia …

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Plants of the Week – February 25

As days grow longer, focus in the garden turns to a range of tasks from tidying hellebore foliage to spreading mulch. Another such task is cutting back select shrubs. From Cornus to Caryopteris and Physocarpus, February is an ideal month to prune. Hydrangea arborescens and selections is another shrub requiring cutback. Degree of cutback is dependent on personal preference with pruning, ranging from near ground level to leaving roughly 12” above ground. Plants flower on new wood so have no fear of cutting back too much. Photo credit: J. Coceano  Location: Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’ planted in mass at Kemp …

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Plants of the Week – February 18

Interested in adding a witchazel to your garden but overwhelmed by the number of cultivar choices available? Rare Find Nursery alone offers over 30 cultivars in their print catalog! While there are numerous yellows, oranges, and reds to choose from, not all are created equal. One factor to consider is the tendency of Hamamelis to drop their leaves in the fall. Some cultivars drop all leaves allowing for a vivid, unobstructed floral display while others hold onto most of the foliage. Here two yellow-flowering Hamamelis x intermedia cultiars bloom side by side. H. x intermedia  ‘Sunburst’ seen on the …

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