Crum Woods Chronicle

Off the Beaten Path: History of the Crum Ruins

Crum Ruins Panorama AFTER 

Guest Author: Marissa Lariviere ‘18

 

Have you ever stumbled across the strange ruins in the Crum Woods? At first glance, these crumbling walls just seem creepy. But don’t run away- this area actually has a long and fascinating history, involving magnificent mansions and dating all the way back to Pennsylvania’s founder, William Penn.

Gardens 4

In 1927, Lytlecote was bought by Ward Hinkson and his wife Edith, and renamed Oak Knoll. The Hinksons would go on to construct an elaborate estate over the 32 acres, turning their home into an iconic site in the area. photo credit: Scott Arboretum Archives

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Unique Ecosystem of Skunk Cabbage Hollow

April 21 2017 RHR 216One of the Five Best Preserved Areas in the Crum Woods

Late this February, I explored Skunk Cabbage Hollow with Crum Woods Restoration Assistant, Michael Rolli. Of the over 200 acres in the Crum Woods, five unique locations are prominent for their excellent state of preservation: the Wister Forest, Martin Forest, Trillium Slope, Skunk Cabbage Hollow, and the Southern Red Oak Forest.

This February, the hillside Wister Garden was covered in winter aconite, Japanese pachysandra, and snowdrops. photo credit: A. Bacon

This February, the hillside of Wister Garden was covered in winter aconite, Japanese pachysandra, and snowdrops. photo credit: A. Bacon

These sites have been subject to many pressures of natural areas, such as invasive species competition, deer browsing, …

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Return of Crumhenge

IMG_9122Near the trestle in the Crum Woods lies a several-acre meadow with a circular arrangement of massive boulders. This formation, inspired by Neolithic structures such as Stonehenge, was appropriately named “Crumhenge.”

 

The original Crumhenge had a graveyard-like quality with thin, tall rectangular rocks standing upright. photo credit: R. Robert

The original Crumhenge had a graveyard-like quality with thin, tall rectangular rocks standing upright. photo credit: R. Robert

The history and purpose of Stonehenge is still something of a mystery, but historians are sure the stones were not arbitrarily arranged. As the UNESCO World Heritage site notes about Stonehenge: “The design, position, and interrelationship of the monuments and sites are evidence of a wealthy and highly organised prehistoric …

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