Happenings

4 Tips to Planning a Fabulous Garden Visit

June 4 2015 RHR 016It is garden visiting season. While it is always a pleasure to visit a garden, here are some tips to make the whole experience a delight from our trip planner extraordinaire, Julie Jenney, Education Program Coordinator for the Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College.

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Make sure you plan out your route ahead of time and leave enough time to enjoy the garden, pit stops, and snack breaks! photo credit: R. Robert

1.Make sure you plan out your route ahead of time and leave enough time to enjoy the garden, pit stops, and snack breaks!

One of biggest mistakes people make is …

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Inspiration from the Turn of Century American Garden Movement

Spring is a time to be inspired. Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) is currently exhibiting how the Turn of Century Garden Movement (1887-1920) inspired American impressionism. As a modern gardener it is fascinating to see the plants which inspired these American artists and gardeners.

While cottage-style gardening is not often used in our modern landscapes, most modern gardeners will recognize some of the genera of plants used. Let’s explore some of the modern cultivars of the plants represented by these painters.

The Crimson Rambler by Phillip Leslie Hale c. 1908 featured the Rosa ‘Crimson Rambler’.

The Crimson Rambler

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Declaring War on Mulch Mounding of Trees

Mike McGrath, radio personality of You Bet Your Garden, has declared war on the practice of mulch mounding of trees! To support his plea to cease and desist this practice, he has interviewed several tree experts including our own curator, Andrew Bunting.

The beautiful root flare of a newly planted Quercus rubra. photo credit: R. Robert

Mulch mounding can be so devastating to trees that the Scott Arboretum only applies mulch on the ground around the tree. When we plant, we even pull back the ground to expose the dramatic root flare.

Gypsy moth have infested this Betula nigra

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