Plant of the Month

Bulbs! Fall is for Planting

DSC06041 RAM

The instant gratification that comes with planting perennials and annuals in an established garden can be immense. You can see how the plant you chose works well with pre-existing inhabitants. The color, the size, and the textures are some of the many things that need to be considered when designing. Unfortunately, one of the most valuable additions to any garden bed does not provide that instant gratification: bulbs.

The early blooming crocus will brighten up that patch of lawn, becoming a sea of purples, greens, and whites in the spring.  photo credit: R. Robert

The early blooming crocus brighten up that patch of lawn in the Cherry Border, becoming a sea of purples, greens, and whites in the spring. photo credit: R. Robert

These little nuggets …

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Hydrangea arborescens ‘Riven Lace’

June 29 2017 RHR 010

A common garden plant in the Eastern United States, Hydrangea arborescens is often bred to display large, heavy inflorescences seen in H. arborescens ‘Annabelle’ or ‘Invincibelle Spirit’, though ‘Riven Lace’ is an exception in that the inflorescences most closely resemble the characteristics of Hydrangea arborescens in the wild: tea-saucer sized corymbs with a few exaggerated bracts dotting the perimeter.

Native to the moist woodlands of the Eastern United States, H. arborescens generally prefers moist conditions in partial shade. Well drained soils are a must, though it will not stand drought conditions. Flowers of this species will emerge on new wood, …

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Yellow Magnolias

Magnolia 'Gold Star' (7) JWCIntroduced and named in 1978, Magnolia ‘Elizabeth’ was a breakthrough in the quest for a yellow-flowering magnolia. While ‘Elizabeth’ is creamy white with subtle hints of yellow, the cultivar opened the door for subsequent introductions that feature bright yellow, golden-yellow, and orange flowers.

While Magnolia ‘Elizabeth’ is creamy white with subtle hints of yellow, the cultivar opened the door for subsequent introductions that feature bright yellow, golden-yellow, and orange flowers. photo credit: J. Coceano

While Magnolia ‘Elizabeth’ is creamy white with subtle hints of yellow, the cultivar opened the door for subsequent introductions that feature bright yellow, golden-yellow, and orange flowers. photo credit: J. Coceano

Patented by the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, ‘Elizabeth’ is a hybrid between M. acuminata and M. denudata. The hardiest of the magnolia species, M. acuminata can …

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