Special Interest

Forgotten Fabulous Fall Color Trails

June 1 2017 RHR 154

Martin Forest: One of the Five Best Preserved Areas in the Crum Woods

As we enter fall color season, we continue our series discussing the five best preserved areas in the Crum Woods. Martin Forest is a 30 acre tract of nearly/entirely forested land, and an ideal area to experience autumn color. This old-growth stand has been described by Roger Latham, an ecologist and conservation biologist, as an extraordinary piece of living history. To give a hiker perspective on the importance of Martin Forest, most of the Crum Woods is mature second-growth forest.

Ancient hemlock towering over the tree canopy in the Martin Forest. photo credit: R. Robert

 An ancient hemlock towering over the tree

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Restoring the Crum Woods

november-3-2016-rhr-473The complication of the SEPTA Viaduct brings to a close a five-year period of construction in the Crum Woods. Seventeen acres of upland forest and wetland were clear-cut for the SEPTA Viaduct construction. Nine different plant communities are part of the restoration plan ranging from lowland meadow to a red oak mixed hardwood forest.

At 2.55 acres, the tulip tree-beech-maple forest planting is the largest restoration community with woody plants in the mix. photo credit: R. Robert

At 2.55 acres, the tulip tree-beech-maple forest planting is the largest restoration community with woody plants in the mix. photo credit: R. Robert

At 2.55 acres, the tulip tree-beech-maple forest planting is the largest restoration community with woody plants in the mix. As the name implies, …

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Beyond Beauty: Why your Rose Garden needs more then Roses

June 10 2015 Update RHR 049Have you visited the modern rose garden? The one interplanted with all types of flowering perennials, trees, and shurbs, alive with buzzing insects, chirping birds and awash in lovely scents. No longer will you find a garden of strictly roses with one month of wow and minimal interaction with birds, bugs, and bees. The renovated Dean Bond Rose Garden has been redesigned with sustainability in mind. The added benefit of considering sustainability in plant selection produces multi-seasonal interest in the rose garden as never before.

Today’s rose garden is interplanted with a variety of plants to encourage the growth of beneficial insect populations to help control unwanted pests. photo credit: R. Robert

Today’s rose garden is interplanted with a variety of plants to encourage the growth of

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